Mercury has an exceptionally low melting temperature for a d-block metal

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Mercury has an exceptionally low melting temperature for a d-block metal

Post by jancancook on Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:40 am

Mercury has an exceptionally low melting temperature for a d-block metal. A complete explanation of this fact requires a deep excursion into quantum physics, but it can be summarized as follows: mercury has a unique electronic configuration where electrons fill up all the available 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, 3d, 4s, 4p, 4d, 4f, 5s, 5p, 5d and 6s subshells. As such configuration strongly resists removal of an electron, mercury behaves similarly to noble gas elements, which form weak bonds and thus easily melting solids. The stability of the 6s shell is due to the presence of a filled 4f shell. An f shell poorly screens the nuclear charge that increases the attractive Coulomb interaction of the 6s shell and the nucleus (see lanthanide contraction). The absence of a filled inner f shell is the reason for the much higher melting temperature of cadmium. Metals such as gold have atoms with one less 6s electron than mercury. Those electrons are more easily removed and are shared between the gold atoms forming relatively strong metallic bonds.[3][5]

กำจัดปลวก กำจัดแมลง ป้องกันปลวก อุปกรณ์กำจัด
Virtual data room

jancancook
Master of the Paranormal
Master of the Paranormal

Male
Number of posts : 468
Age : 31
Location : Viet Nam
Registration date : 2011-02-15

View user profile

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum